Night Driving

No time to read a long-winded BLOnG? Welcome to the Three-Second-Stop mini-Blog.

Today’s Three Seconds: Overdriving Your Headlights

3 Second StopOver half of motor vehicle crashes happen when it is dark out. For this reason we should remind ourselves to be even more aware of our surroundings at night.  An issue to avoid when driving at night is overdriving your headlights. Overdriving your headlights occurs when you cannot stop within the space lighted by your headlights, or in other words, by the time you can see a hazard ahead, you don’t have enough time to stop or respond safely. Instead you should drive at a slow enough speed so that your vision in your headlights is greater or equal to your stopping distance.

National Work Zone Awareness 2016

April 11-15, 2016: Respect the Orange

The week of April 11-15, 2016, the Federal Highway Administration encourages, “Don’t Be THAT Driver!” This year’s National Work Zone Awareness theme focuses on a current road safety topic: distracted driving. Construction zones are dangerous enough without mixing in the added hazard of driving distractions. With so much confusion going on in a work zone, taking your eyes off the road, hands off the wheel and/or mind off of driving, even for a second, can lead to an unfortunate crash. Besides being aware of in-vehicle distractions also avoid the temptation to try and see what the road workers are doing. Remember to slow down to a safe speed, drive more cautiously and focus on the task at hand.

Danger Zone

Road Work and You

Today marks the close of 2015 National Work Zone Awareness Week which advised drivers to “Expect the Unexpected”. Road worker safety is always good to have in the forefront of your mind, especially in the coming summer months as road construction will undoubtedly increase. The main thing to remember when you see orange (signs, cones, and vests) along the road is slow down and drive more cautiously. Keep your focus on navigating through the changing lanes, speeds and road conditions. The smallest distraction could be disastrous. Obey the posted construction signs and workers giving you instructions. And if safety for all is not a good enough motivator, remember almost all states have larger fines for speeding and other traffic infractions in a construction zone.

Proceed with Caution: Driving in the Rain

No time to read a long-winded BLOnG? Welcome to the Three-Second-Stop mini-Blog.

Today’s Three Seconds: Rain and Wet Roads

s6rain2_web3 Second StopHere are some quick tips for driving in wet weather:

  • Slow down.
  • Use your low-beams headlights.
  • Drive in the tracks left by the vehicle ahead of you.
  • Be as smooth as possible.
  • Leave extra space to brake.
  • Slow down through deep water.

It takes the average car twice as long to stop on a wet road as on a dry road!

Silly Drivers, School Zones Are For Kids

Slow Down in School Zones

When kids are present, School Zones are Slow Zones. Here’s some simple advice to keep the kids, and your driving record, safe:

  • When entering a marked school zone, your foot should be covering the brake pedal and your eyes scanning the road. You know how kids can be: they’ll jump out of nowhere and run across the street when you least expect it.
  • Regardless if it’s a school day or not, when children are in sight, school zones require you to follow the posted 25mph or slower speed limit. For example, if it’s a Saturday night at 10pm and you are in a school zone when kids are present (maybe a school dance just let out), you still need to adjust your speed and obey the slower school zone speed limit.

When you slow down for children, you not only make yourself a safe driver, you also help alert other unaware drivers who may not see the obstacles you see. When they see you slowing down, their driving intuition will kick in and they will follow your safe-driving lead.