Smaller Road Users



Did you know that motorcyclists and bicyclists share the same rights as other vehicle drivers? Bicyclists and motorcyclists must follow laws and regulations just as drivers of automobiles. Since both cyclists and motorcyclist are less visible and much smaller than the average car, we have to be mindful and always keep an extra eye out for them as they face different challenges; challenges that other motorists might not always face. Weather can impact cyclist and motorcyclists much differently. Rain, wind, sun glare, and low light can make driving much more dangerous for them than for drivers of passenger vehicles. So when you’re in your car and see a bicyclist or motorcyclist make sure to treat them with the same consideration as you would any other vehicle on the roadway.

Windy Weather Conditions

With Spring just around the corner it’s important to know what comes along with it. Spring is known for being the season of new beginnings, but did you know it is also the windiest season?

During the months of March and April wind speeds tend to be about 3 to 5 times stronger than other months. With strong winds come High Wind advisories. But what does that have to do with driving? Well, high wind is on the list of top car accident causes because high wind advisories are usually overlooked by drivers. When driving in high winds there are a few precautions you should be taking.

During high winds be sure to slow down, maintain a firm grip on the steering wheel, and keep a safe distance from larger vehicles such as busses, trucks, and RVs.  Larger vehicles are more affected by high winds and usually have difficulty staying in their own lane. And as always, make sure to be alert and aware of your surroundings.

Stay safe and have a wonderful Spring!

*This traffic safety topic is covered in our 8-hour California Traffic School course for traffic tickets. If you need traffic school to keep a moving violation hidden on your driving record, sign up today at https://www.trafficschool.com/california/california-traffic-school/?source=blog_02162022

General Tips to Avoid Skids

Loss of vehicle control can be scary. To help avoid skidding on slippery surfaces, reduce your speed and increase your following distance behind the vehicle ahead.

In addition, you can:

Beware of Icy or Wet Locations

Ice tends to collect in shady areas, under bridges and overpasses, and low points on the road. As a result, on cold days slow down even more when approaching shaded areas, bridges, overpasses, and dips.

Don’t Make Sudden Maneuvers

Sudden changes in acceleration, braking, or fast turns can spin your car out of control and into a skid, especially on an icy or wet road where traction is greatly reduced.

Keep to the Paved Portion of the Road

Don’t drive on the road edge or the shoulder; poorly maintained pavement, gravel or dirt surfaces could cause a loss of vehicle control.

Driver Distraction: Texting While Driving

When you are behind the wheel of your car, the most important responsibility is safe driving. 

Driving is a skill that requires your complete attention to not only control your vehicle but also respond in case something happens up ahead or around your vehicle. It involves continuous and complex coordination between your body and mind. Anything that prevents you from operating your car safely is considered a distraction.  This video from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration shows just how scary it can be to drive a car while texting.

Stop On Red 2020

National Stop on Red Week starts this Sunday, August 2 and runs through August 8. Red-light running is extremely dangerous.  Red-light runners cause hundreds of deaths and tens of thousands of injuries each year. Together, we can put a halt to the crashes, injuries and fatalities. Make the choice to stay alert and help people stay alive.

Look Before You Park

Colored Curbs


Recently I noticed a couple vehicles attempting to park next to a red painted curb, which in California is a big no-no. Curb markings are painted different colors to indicate what type of parking, if any, is permitted. California curb colors and their meanings are as follows:

  • Red: Parking, stopping, or standing is PROHIBITED at all times, except a bus may stop in a red zone marked or posted as a bus loading zone.
  • White: Reserved for very brief stops for the purpose of loading or unloading passengers or depositing mail in an adjacent mailbox.
  • Blue: Parking is permitted for vehicles displaying disabled placards or license plates.
  • Green: Reserved for vehicles to park for a limited amount of time. Look for time limits painted on the curb or on a sign posted next to the green zone.
  • Yellow: Loading Zones usually reserved for commercial vehicles. Drivers may stop only long enough to unload passengers or freight. Drivers of non-commercial vehicles are usually required to stay with the vehicle.

Parking regulations and the use of colored curbs are set by local authorities. To find out designated curb colors near you, be sure to familiarize yourself with your local and state laws.