Summertime Dangers

With summer just a few months away we have a few tips to make your summer a safe one.

Summer brings sunnier days and sunnier days make for harsh sun glare. Sun glare can be extremely dangerous while driving. The NHTSA or the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration states that sun glare is the cause of approximately 9,000 accidents per year. Make sure to have a pair of sunglasses to shield your eyes, but be sure to avoid frames with wide side pieces that reduce your ability to see to the side!

With summer also comes heat and we tend to change our choice of footwear to something lighter. While flip-flops are great for the pool or for walking along the beach, they can be a hazard while driving since they can get stuck underneath the brake or the accelerator. Experts even claim that flip-flops can actually double the time that it takes for a driver to brake. Flip-flop accidents are not that rare. In 2013, a study was conducted and it turned out that 7% of drivers who were polled had actually crashed or nearly caused a crash because of the flimsy sandals!

Have a safe summer and another quick summer reminder: Never leave children or animals in the car unattended. The temperatures in a vehicle can reach dangerously high temperatures in just minutes.

Windy Weather Conditions

With Spring just around the corner it’s important to know what comes along with it. Spring is known for being the season of new beginnings, but did you know it is also the windiest season?

During the months of March and April wind speeds tend to be about 3 to 5 times stronger than other months. With strong winds come High Wind advisories. But what does that have to do with driving? Well, high wind is on the list of top car accident causes because high wind advisories are usually overlooked by drivers. When driving in high winds there are a few precautions you should be taking.

During high winds be sure to slow down, maintain a firm grip on the steering wheel, and keep a safe distance from larger vehicles such as busses, trucks, and RVs.  Larger vehicles are more affected by high winds and usually have difficulty staying in their own lane. And as always, make sure to be alert and aware of your surroundings.

Stay safe and have a wonderful Spring!

*This traffic safety topic is covered in our 8-hour California Traffic School course for traffic tickets. If you need traffic school to keep a moving violation hidden on your driving record, sign up today at https://www.trafficschool.com/california/california-traffic-school/?source=blog_02162022

Poor Vision

No time to read a long-winded BLOnG? Welcome to the Three-Second-Stop mini-Blog.

Today’s Three Seconds: Night Blindness

3 Second Stop

Compensate for poor night vision by slowing down.  This gives you time to identify a potential hazard in your headlights and react to avoid it by stopping in time.  Also, avoid looking directly into the headlights of an approaching vehicle. Instead, guide your car by looking at the road markers on the right-hand side of the road.

*This traffic safety topic is covered in our 8-hour California Traffic School course for traffic tickets.  If you need traffic school to keep a moving violation off your driving record, sign up today at https://www.trafficschool.com/california/california-traffic-school/?source=blog_07302021

Self-Regulation Techniques

More and more, today’s driving schools and defensive driving institutions teach self-regulation to drivers of all ages. Drivers who self-regulate make driving decisions based on experience to limit certain driving behaviors in order to keep themselves out of harm’s way on the road.   For instance, do you ever find yourself making multiple right turns to avoid having to make a tricky left turn at a hectic intersection? Then you, like many other safe drivers, are practicing self-regulating techniques.

Here are some other common self-regulation techniques you can try:

  • Limiting your night driving (this is the most widespread form of self-regulation)
  • Limiting your driving during bad weather
  • Choosing routes that avoid congestion, construction, and difficult traffic scenarios
  • Driving in the lane you are most comfortable with (i.e. driving in the slower lanes or not driving in the lane directly adjacent to parked cars)
  • Not making optional right turns at red traffic lights
  • Limiting the volume on your radio so you can better hear traffic and emergency vehicles
  • Parking towards the back of parking lots where it is less congested

*This traffic safety topic is covered in our 8-hour California Traffic School course for traffic tickets.  If you need traffic school to keep a moving violation off your driving record, sign up today at https://www.trafficschool.com/california/california-traffic-school/?source=blog_06302021

Intersection Safety

No time to read a long-winded BLOnG? Welcome to the Three-Second-Stop mini-Blog.

Today’s Three Seconds: Judging Time to Make a Maneuver

3 Second Stop

Judging time to make a maneuver requires you to estimate the distance and speed of other vehicles, and then proceed when you believe you have enough time to execute the maneuver safely. Whenever you drive in city traffic, you should always look a block ahead. It takes approximately 10 to 15 seconds to travel one block. If you are traveling on a highway with several lanes, or on a divided highway, check for vehicles in all lanes that you have to cross. Don’t forget to look for smaller bicyclists and motorcyclists and check crosswalks for pedestrians. You should cross or turn only after you have determined that you can complete the movement safely without impeding other road users.

Labor Day Weekend

 
 
Summer is drawing to a close. For many families the Labor Day weekend is a time for one last road trip before getting back into the school year groove. More people on the roads means greater potential for something to go wrong. While you enjoy your holiday please be vigilant behind the wheel and remember to:

  • Stay alert and drive defensively
  • Wear your seat belt
  • Drive sober
  • Avoid drowsy driving
  • Avoid driving distractions

Holiday Travels and Aggressive Driving

 

An interesting report from GasBuddy found that Americans tend to drive 175% more aggressively during the holidays. GasBuddy looked at the number of instances quick accelerating, hard braking, and speeding occurred during the Thanksgiving holiday (November 21 – 25, 2018). The results showed that these aggressive driving events happened most often on the day leading up to the holiday. Aggressive driving is not only dangerous, it is also hard on your gas consumption. This is something to keep in mind with upcoming holiday travels. Some tips for your holiday trips: Plan ahead so you have plenty of time to reach your destination. Take a deep breath, relax, and drive with courtesy. Our goal should be for us all to get where we are going safely. Drive safe and have a happy holiday season!