Independence Day


July 4th is a celebration of American independence and freedom. Don’t jeopardize your freedom by drinking and driving. Law enforcement across the US are taking part in the Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over campaign during the 4th of July holiday period, June 29 through July 5, 2019, to put an end to drunk driving.

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) reports that over the 4th of July holiday period in 2017 (6 p.m. June 30 to 5:59 a.m. July 5), 601 people died in motor vehicle traffic crashes. 39% (237) of those fatalities occurred in alcohol-impaired crashes. This is a 23% increase from 2016, during which 192 people were killed during the same holiday period. NHTSA urges drivers to designate a sober driver before heading out for the evening. If you plan on drinking, plan on not driving.

Temperature Rising

 

‘Look Before You Lock’ PSA from KidsAndCars.org is a good reminder to not leave children in cars in order to avoid heatstroke fatalities. In a new study, Consumer Reports found that, “Even on days with mild temperatures, the heat inside a closed vehicle can reach dangerous levels within an hour, posing major health risks to small children or pets left inside.”

For additional tips and information, check out our past posts Vehicular Heatstroke and Supervision Required.

Blinded by Light

No time to read a long-winded BLOnG? Welcome to the Three-Second-Stop mini-Blog.

Today’s Three Seconds: Sun Glare

3 Second StopDriving in bright sunlight can pose a threat, even more so if your windshield is dirty. Cleaning your windshield (both inside and out) should be done often. In normal daylight conditions, a dirty windshield can reduce your visibility and in high sunlight situations, a dirty windshield can lead to having no visibility at all. If you’re having problems seeing due to sun glare, remember that others on the road are having the same trouble. Leave yourself sufficient following distance and be extra alert.

Road Hazard

No time to read a long-winded BLOnG? Welcome to the Three-Second-Stop mini-Blog.

Today’s Three Seconds: Flooded Roadways

3 Second StopExcessive rain can lead to flooded roadways which pose a danger for drivers. Six inches of water on a roadway can impair your car and cause it to stall. Twelve inches of water could cause your vehicle to float. Standing water on the road can hide debris, downed power lines, and sink holes. If at all possible you should attempt to find a different route when you come across a flooded roadway. If you have no other option but to proceed through standing water, then drive very slowly and after you have exited the water, dry your brakes by driving slowly and braking lightly. If you think the water is deeper than six inches, do not attempt to drive through it.

New Law for 2019

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Today’s Three Seconds: Passing Waste Service Vehicles

3 Second StopA new law went into effect January 1, 2019, aimed at providing sanitation workers with more room to safely do their jobs. California Vehicle Code 21761−Passing Waste Service Vehicles requires motorists, when approaching and overtaking a stopped waste service vehicle with its amber lights flashing, to move into an available lane adjacent to the waste service vehicle and pass at a safe distance. If it is not possible to make a lane change, drivers must slow to a safe and reasonable speed.

Holiday Travels and Aggressive Driving

 

An interesting report from GasBuddy found that Americans tend to drive 175% more aggressively during the holidays. GasBuddy looked at the number of instances quick accelerating, hard braking, and speeding occurred during the Thanksgiving holiday (November 21 – 25, 2018). The results showed that these aggressive driving events happened most often on the day leading up to the holiday. Aggressive driving is not only dangerous, it is also hard on your gas consumption. This is something to keep in mind with upcoming holiday travels. Some tips for your holiday trips: Plan ahead so you have plenty of time to reach your destination. Take a deep breath, relax, and drive with courtesy. Our goal should be for us all to get where we are going safely. Drive safe and have a happy holiday season!

Holiday Parking Tips

The holiday season means holiday shopping for many.  The Turlock PD shared a video with three simple tips to help avoid your parked vehicle being the target of a break in.

  1. Lock your doors.
  2. Roll your windows all the way up.
  3. Don’t leave your personal belongings in plain sight.

Night Driving

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Today’s Three Seconds: Overdriving Your Headlights

3 Second StopOver half of motor vehicle crashes happen when it is dark out. For this reason we should remind ourselves to be even more aware of our surroundings at night.  An issue to avoid when driving at night is overdriving your headlights. Overdriving your headlights occurs when you cannot stop within the space lighted by your headlights, or in other words, by the time you can see a hazard ahead, you don’t have enough time to stop or respond safely. Instead you should drive at a slow enough speed so that your vision in your headlights is greater or equal to your stopping distance.

Defensive Driving Tip

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Today’s Three Seconds: IPDE Technique

3 Second StopAn essential part of defensive driving is being alert and attentive to your driving environment. At all times when driving, you must be aware of what is happening all around your vehicle, continuously scanning and searching for potential problems that may lead to a collision.

The “IPDE” technique is a four-step system used by drivers to anticipate and avoid collisions. IPDE stands for Identify, Predict, Decide, Execute and simply means:

1. Identify the potential problem.
2. Predict how the potential problem will affect you.
3. Decide what things you can do to avoid the potential problem.
4. Execute the maneuver that best avoids the potential problem.