Keep Them Safe

Child Passenger Restraints

rear-facing-child-seatJanuary 1st, 2017 ushers in new laws and regulations. In California one new law affecting motorist and parents will require child passengers under the age of two to be secured in rear-facing child safety seats.

Transporting children in age- and size-appropriate car seats, booster seats, or seat belts is key to keeping kids safe on the road. According to National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), child safety seats lower the risk of fatal injury for infants (under 1 year old) by 71% and by 54% for toddlers (1 to 4 years old) in passenger cars.

NHTSA recommends using a Rear-Facing Car Seat for as long as possible: age 0 to 3 years or once your child outgrows the rear-facing car seat. Rear-facing seats are the safest way to transport a child as in a crash the impact force is more evenly distributed along the outer shell of the seat, keeping the child’s neck and spine in line.

Be sure to read the instruction manual for your child safety seat as well as your vehicle owner’s manual on car seat installation. Check height and weight limits of the car seat and never place a rear-facing car seat in the front seat or in front of an active airbag.

To-and-Fro: Stay Safe as You Go

School Bus Passenger Tips

School is starting all across the country. Now is a good time to teach, or remind, your little ones about school bus safety.

  1. When waiting at the bus stop, stay on the sidewalk, away from the road. Pay attention to what is going on around you. Don’t get distracted by playing with your friends.
  2. When getting on the bus, find a seat promptly and sit down facing the front of the bus. Sit still and talk quietly with your neighbor. Don’t distract the bus driver with a lot of ruckus. Let them do their job safely driving you to school.
  3. When exiting the bus, be aware of passing cars. Put distance between you and the bus so the bus driver will be able to see you. Stay away from the wheels of the bus and remember to cross in front of the bus, not behind it.

It’s That Time Again…

No time to read a long-winded BLOnG? Welcome to the Three-Second-Stop mini-Blog.

schoolbuskids_webToday’s Three Seconds: School Bus Safety

3 Second StopLaws vary by state, be sure to consult your local DMV for your state regulations. However in most states, when a school bus is stopped with red flashing lights to load or unload passengers, vehicles traveling in either direction are required to stop. They must remain stopped until the lights are no longer flashing. Generally the only exception is for traffic traveling in the opposite direction of the school bus on a road divided by a physical barrier.

Supervision Required

Why You Shouldn’t Leave Your Kids Alone in the Car

Where's Baby?  Look Before you Lock
Sure, you’re only dropping some mail off at the post office, grabbing some milk from the grocery store, or picking up the dry cleaning. I mean there’s no harm in that right, especially when it only requires a couple minutes of your time, so leaving your child in the car for just a moment should be fine, right? Wrong! According to Safe Kids, 30 children die each year when they are left unsupervised in the car. It only takes seconds for something horrific to happen.

Not only is it scary for a small child to be left alone, but your vehicle’s temperature can change dramatically, and very quickly, which can affect your child’s oxygen levels, and in some cases causing hyperthermia and/or suffocation.

Aside from temperature changes, inadvertent gear-shift crashes, locking parents out of the car, trunk entrapments, or getting limbs caught in the windows, are just some of the many possible dangers leaving a child unattended in a vehicle could lead to. This is considered a misdemeanor offense; the offense can become a felony if there are resulting injuries.

Waking up a sleeping child or getting a toddler out of a car seat in the freezing cold or rain can be quite a hassle, so it’s understandable why many parents fall victim to this. But, if you need money, find a drive through ATM. If you need gas, use a credit card at the pump, or find a full-service station. Whatever you do, just don’t leave your child in the car alone!

Silly Drivers, School Zones Are For Kids

Slow Down in School Zones

When kids are present, School Zones are Slow Zones. Here’s some simple advice to keep the kids, and your driving record, safe:

  • When entering a marked school zone, your foot should be covering the brake pedal and your eyes scanning the road. You know how kids can be: they’ll jump out of nowhere and run across the street when you least expect it.
  • Regardless if it’s a school day or not, when children are in sight, school zones require you to follow the posted 25mph or slower speed limit. For example, if it’s a Saturday night at 10pm and you are in a school zone when kids are present (maybe a school dance just let out), you still need to adjust your speed and obey the slower school zone speed limit.

When you slow down for children, you not only make yourself a safe driver, you also help alert other unaware drivers who may not see the obstacles you see. When they see you slowing down, their driving intuition will kick in and they will follow your safe-driving lead.