Parking Safety

No time to read a long-winded BLOnG? Welcome to the Three-Second-Stop mini-Blog.

Today’s Three Seconds: Parking on a Hill

3 Second Stop

When parking on a hill or steep incline, it is important to take the necessary steps to ensure that your vehicle doesn’t roll into the flow of traffic. If you are parking next to a curb facing uphill, turn your front tires away from the curb, then gently let your vehicle roll back so your front tire is touching the curb. In all other hill parking scenarios (downhill with curb, uphill without curb, and downhill without curb), turn your front tires towards the curb or side of the road.  Always set your parking brake. It is separate from your regular braking system, so both systems don’t fail at the same time. Also, leave your vehicle in gear if you have a standard transmission (stick-shift), or in “park” position if it is an automatic. Remember, the goal when parking on a steep hill is to make sure your vehicle doesn’t roll into other traffic, potentially causing a collision.

Intersection Safety

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Today’s Three Seconds: Judging Time to Make a Maneuver

3 Second Stop

Judging time to make a maneuver requires you to estimate the distance and speed of other vehicles, and then proceed when you believe you have enough time to execute the maneuver safely. Whenever you drive in city traffic, you should always look a block ahead. It takes approximately 10 to 15 seconds to travel one block. If you are traveling on a highway with several lanes, or on a divided highway, check for vehicles in all lanes that you have to cross. Don’t forget to look for smaller bicyclists and motorcyclists and check crosswalks for pedestrians. You should cross or turn only after you have determined that you can complete the movement safely without impeding other road users.

Temperature Rising

 

‘Look Before You Lock’ PSA from KidsAndCars.org is a good reminder to not leave children in cars in order to avoid heatstroke fatalities. In a new study, Consumer Reports found that, “Even on days with mild temperatures, the heat inside a closed vehicle can reach dangerous levels within an hour, posing major health risks to small children or pets left inside.”

For additional tips and information, check out our past posts Vehicular Heatstroke and Supervision Required.

Holiday Parking Tips

The holiday season means holiday shopping for many.  The Turlock PD shared a video with three simple tips to help avoid your parked vehicle being the target of a break in.

  1. Lock your doors.
  2. Roll your windows all the way up.
  3. Don’t leave your personal belongings in plain sight.

Night Driving

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Today’s Three Seconds: Overdriving Your Headlights

3 Second StopOver half of motor vehicle crashes happen when it is dark out. For this reason we should remind ourselves to be even more aware of our surroundings at night.  An issue to avoid when driving at night is overdriving your headlights. Overdriving your headlights occurs when you cannot stop within the space lighted by your headlights, or in other words, by the time you can see a hazard ahead, you don’t have enough time to stop or respond safely. Instead you should drive at a slow enough speed so that your vision in your headlights is greater or equal to your stopping distance.

Defensive Driving Tip

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Today’s Three Seconds: IPDE Technique

3 Second StopAn essential part of defensive driving is being alert and attentive to your driving environment. At all times when driving, you must be aware of what is happening all around your vehicle, continuously scanning and searching for potential problems that may lead to a collision.

The “IPDE” technique is a four-step system used by drivers to anticipate and avoid collisions. IPDE stands for Identify, Predict, Decide, Execute and simply means:

1. Identify the potential problem.
2. Predict how the potential problem will affect you.
3. Decide what things you can do to avoid the potential problem.
4. Execute the maneuver that best avoids the potential problem.