100 Deadliest Days

For many people, summer unofficially starts Memorial Day and ends on Labor Day. While the start of summer is an exciting time for most, not many people know that the time period from Memorial Day to Labor Day is considered the 100 Deadliest Days of Summer, especially for teen drivers. From the year 2010 to 2019, over 7,000 Americans died in teen related driving accidents between Memorial Day and Labor Day. The NSC (National Safety Council) has noted an association between the monthly number of vehicle miles traveled and motor-vehicle fatalities. The NSC states that mileage and motor vehicle death rates increase during the summer months, particularly the months of July and August. So, don’t let your guard down while we are enjoying lighter traffic due to schools being out for summer vacation. Always be alert and aware of other drivers around you… summer vacation doesn’t mean you should take a vacation from good defensive driving habits.

Holiday Travel Dangers

When thinking of Thanksgiving, many things come to mind; such as food, family, blessings, maybe even a pleasant memory. But does “dangerous” come to mind? Probably not.

Did you know that the National Safety Council estimates that about 515 people may die on U.S. roads this Thanksgiving holiday? That is the most deaths estimated for the Thanksgiving holiday period since 2007. According to the American Automobile Association, it is estimated that more than 53.4 million people will travel this year for Thanksgiving, with the majority of those choosing to travel by car. Car travel has the highest fatality rate in the U.S. for unintentional injury deaths. Alcohol is also a factor adding to the holiday’s high fatality rate. During the Thanksgiving Day weekend (Wednesday evening through Sunday afternoon), about 29% of fatalities that occur are caused by the alcohol-impaired driver.

While this holiday may include car travel and possibly alcohol, making simple choices, such as wearing your seatbelt and having a designated driver can keep you much safer. So, while you’re gobbling up your meal this Thanksgiving, decide to drink responsibly, and as always make sure to wear your seatbelt. It could possibly save your life.

Party with a Plan

If your Halloween weekend includes celebrating with cocktails, be sure to make plans for a sober ride home in advance.  The U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) reminds us that Buzzed Driving Is Drunk Driving. According to NHTSA, 41% of all people killed in motor vehicle crashes on Halloween night from 2015 to 2019 were in crashes involving a drunk driver.  Since Halloween lands on a Sunday this year, that will likely mean more parties throughout the weekend, with more opportunities to make responsible choices.  Enjoy your spooky parties, but have a designated driver, or use public transportation or a ride service to get home safely!

Memorial Day Weekend

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Whatever your plans are for this Memorial Day weekend, be sure they include staying safe on the road.  Don’t take chances.  Follow this simple strategy to reduce your risk behind the wheel:

  • Don’t drive after drinking alcohol.
  • Don’t drive impaired by drugs.
  • Don’t drive distracted.
  • Always wear your seat belt.

Stay safe and enjoy your extended weekend!

Make It Home for the Holidays

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is once again teaming up with law enforcement across the United States during the 2019 Holiday Season to increase enforcement targeting the traffic safety issue of impaired driving. The enforcement campaigns, Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over and If You Feel Different, You Drive Different. Drive High, Get a DUI, run from December 13, 2019, through January 1, 2020 to coincide with the 2019 holiday season. The Holiday Season is one of the deadliest times of the year in terms of impaired-driving fatalities.

NHTSA reminds us, “It doesn’t matter what term you use: If a person is feeling a little high, buzzed, stoned, wasted, or drunk, he or she is impaired and should never get behind the wheel.”

Labor Day Weekend

 
 
Summer is drawing to a close. For many families the Labor Day weekend is a time for one last road trip before getting back into the school year groove. More people on the roads means greater potential for something to go wrong. While you enjoy your holiday please be vigilant behind the wheel and remember to:

  • Stay alert and drive defensively
  • Wear your seat belt
  • Drive sober
  • Avoid drowsy driving
  • Avoid driving distractions

Independence Day


July 4th is a celebration of American independence and freedom. Don’t jeopardize your freedom by drinking and driving. Law enforcement across the US are taking part in the Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over campaign during the 4th of July holiday period, June 29 through July 5, 2019, to put an end to drunk driving.

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) reports that over the 4th of July holiday period in 2017 (6 p.m. June 30 to 5:59 a.m. July 5), 601 people died in motor vehicle traffic crashes. 39% (237) of those fatalities occurred in alcohol-impaired crashes. This is a 23% increase from 2016, during which 192 people were killed during the same holiday period. NHTSA urges drivers to designate a sober driver before heading out for the evening. If you plan on drinking, plan on not driving.

Holiday Travels and Aggressive Driving

 

An interesting report from GasBuddy found that Americans tend to drive 175% more aggressively during the holidays. GasBuddy looked at the number of instances quick accelerating, hard braking, and speeding occurred during the Thanksgiving holiday (November 21 – 25, 2018). The results showed that these aggressive driving events happened most often on the day leading up to the holiday. Aggressive driving is not only dangerous, it is also hard on your gas consumption. This is something to keep in mind with upcoming holiday travels. Some tips for your holiday trips: Plan ahead so you have plenty of time to reach your destination. Take a deep breath, relax, and drive with courtesy. Our goal should be for us all to get where we are going safely. Drive safe and have a happy holiday season!

Holiday Parking Tips

The holiday season means holiday shopping for many.  The Turlock PD shared a video with three simple tips to help avoid your parked vehicle being the target of a break in.

  1. Lock your doors.
  2. Roll your windows all the way up.
  3. Don’t leave your personal belongings in plain sight.

Make Your Own Luck

St. Patrick’s Day 2018

St. Patrick’s Day for many means drinking lots of green beer. In fact, March 17th is ranked the 4th most popular drinking day behind New Year’s Eve, Christmas, and the 4th of July, according to WalletHub. So, while you are preparing for a fun night out, take a look at these sobering statistics from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, and as always, please remember that drinking and driving don’t mix.

  • St. Patrick’s Day is one of the deadliest holidays on our nation’s roads. During the 2012-2016 St. Patrick’s Day holiday period (6 p.m. March 16 to 5:59 a.m. March 18), 269 lives were lost due in drunk-driving crashes.
  • In 2016 alone, 60 people (39% of all crash fatalities) were killed in drunk-driving crashes over the St. Patrick’s Day holiday period.
  • Between midnight and 5:59 a.m. March 18, 2016, almost three-fourths (69%) of crash fatalities involved a drunk driver.
  • Walking home from the bar after a night out partying? That can also be dangerous. In 2016, 36% of the pedestrians killed in crashes had blood alcohol concentrations (BAC) of .08 or higher.

Please make arrangements in advance to get home safely. Have a designated driver in your group, plan to use public transportation, or utilize Uber or Lyft. Bottom line, be sure you have a sober ride lined up before you take your first sip.