Look Before You Park

Colored Curbs


Recently I noticed a couple vehicles attempting to park next to a red painted curb, which in California is a big no-no. Curb markings are painted different colors to indicate what type of parking, if any, is permitted. California curb colors and their meanings are as follows:

  • Red: Parking, stopping, or standing is PROHIBITED at all times, except a bus may stop in a red zone marked or posted as a bus loading zone.
  • White: Reserved for very brief stops for the purpose of loading or unloading passengers or depositing mail in an adjacent mailbox.
  • Blue: Parking is permitted for vehicles displaying disabled placards or license plates.
  • Green: Reserved for vehicles to park for a limited amount of time. Look for time limits painted on the curb or on a sign posted next to the green zone.
  • Yellow: Loading Zones usually reserved for commercial vehicles. Drivers may stop only long enough to unload passengers or freight. Drivers of non-commercial vehicles are usually required to stay with the vehicle.

Parking regulations and the use of colored curbs are set by local authorities. To find out designated curb colors near you, be sure to familiarize yourself with your local and state laws.

Marijuana on the Road

Cannabis Use in Vehicles

Effective January 1, 2018, the California vehicle code has been updated to make it illegal to smoke or ingest marijuana or any marijuana product when driving or riding as a passenger in a vehicle.  Drugged driving laws have been in place for many years, but this law specifically addresses the use of cannabis products while driving.

Marijuana and driving don’t mix.  According to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), marijuana negatively affects a number of skills required for safe driving, such as slow reaction time and your ability to make decisions.  The California Office of Traffic Safety states that the effects of marijuana are strongest during the first hour of use and driving right after using marijuana could double your risk of being in a crash.  The National Institute on Drug Abuse also notes that after alcohol, marijuana is the drug most often found in the blood of drivers involved in crashes.

So please remember, driving under the influence of drugs, even legal drugs, is not only unsafe, but is also a crime.

New Phone Restrictions While Driving

No time to read a long-winded BLOnG? Welcome to the Three-Second-Stop mini-Blog.

Today’s Three Seconds: California AB 1785 Effective Jan. 1, 2017

navigation-13 Second StopBeginning today, the rules as to how drivers can use a smartphone and other handheld devices just got a whole lot stricter. Besides not being able to write or read texts by hand, it is now illegal to “hold and operate” a handheld wireless telephone or electronic communications device for any reason while driving. Bottom line: If a driver in CA still wants to use a phone while driving, they can’t be holding it in-hand. Now the device must be mounted or affixed to the vehicle’s windshield, dashboard or center console without obstructing the view of the road, and the driver may only use a single swipe or tap of the finger to operate a function or feature on the device.

Note: This new law does not apply to manufacturer-installed systems that are embedded in a vehicle.

Learn more at https://www.dmv.ca.gov/.